Gerri Connaught ‘09

Gerri Connaught ‘09

After graduating from Bishop Kearney in 2009, Gerri attended Brooklyn College where she was a part of the Honors Academy Scholars Program and a member of both the Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society and the Psi Chi International Honor Society in Psychology. She graduated Magna Cum Laude from Brooklyn College with a B.A. in Psychology in 2013. From there, Gerri went on to attain her Master of Social Work degree from the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College, specializing in Health and Mental Health. While attending Hunter, Gerri interned at Borough of Manhattan Community College with CUNY PROVE (Project for Return and Opportunity in Veterans Education). As part of CUNY PROVE, Gerri provided psychosocial, emotional, and academic counseling to student veterans who were transitioning from the military into life as a civilian and college student. She also interned for a program called BC Bound at Brooklyn College where she provided counseling to students who were transitioning into their first year of college. After graduating with her MSW in 2015, Gerri became a licensed social work practitioner and worked for two years as an Academic and Career Advisor for college freshmen at the Parsons School of Design at The New School. While in her role as an advisor, Gerri became a member of several committees and task forces designed to promote and maintain student success for various student populations. Her work as an advisor is what inspired her to pursue a doctoral degree in Social Work. Gerri is currently a PhD student at the Silver School of Social Work at New York University. Her research will focus on how higher education institutions can provide more support to first-generation college students and students of color. She plans to explore the issue of Imposter Phenomenon among these student populations, a psychological pattern in which an individual doubts their accomplishments, and has a persistent internalized fear of being exposed as a “fraud.” She hopes to study how this phenomenon impacts first-generation college students of color, their self-esteem, and their retention rates.